》Stories

New Southbound Policy。

The Wafting Fragrance of Incense

The Klenteng Hong Tiek Hian, a traditional Chinese place of worship in Surabaya, has a history of more than 700 years. It still maintains its cultural tradition of daily puppet play performances, with the sounds of drums and gongs reverberating inside and outside the building. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Surabaya, the Years of Struggle: Taiwanese Firms in Indonesia’s Second City

Surabaya, with a population of 3 million, is Indonesia’s second largest city, and one of its most modern. Taiwanese businesspeople first began going there in the 1970s. In the 1990s a large new group moved in, and today everywhere you look you see signs of their presence. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

The Many Faces of Indonesia

Indonesia has a population of some 260 million people and is enjoying GDP growth of more than 5% in 2017, making it both an enormous market and an engine for growth within the recently created ASEAN Economic Community. The country is undergoing wholesale change and international investors are taking notice. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Dough Sculpting the Java Way -- A Migrant Worker Kneads Her Dreams

Traditional dough sculpture from China has its origins in the culture of sacrificial rites. The first forms were shaped from rice flour dough to take the place of animals, like pigs and fish, that people were no longer willing to kill as offerings. Today these figurines have evolved into collectible miniatures of all kinds, including animal motifs and cartoon characters. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Beyond Taiwan: Realizing Entrepreneurial Dreams in Indonesia

Traffic-clogged roads and ubiquitous department stores comprise the initial impressions of many a visitor to Indonesia’s Jakarta. But the capital’s street scene has undergone a subtle change in recent years. Besides eye-catching public construction projects, fully uniformed Go-Jek and Grab drivers now shuttle among the boulevards and alleyways. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Reawakening Nanfang’ao: A Fishing Harbor’s Cultural Star Rises

An old fishing harbor that is nearing its centennial, Nan­fang’ao is at a crossroads. Like a setting sun, its former glory once reflected gorgeous colors against the clouds as it sank into the horizon. The night sky brought the joys of new growth. Now, as dawn arrives with a rising tide lapping against the shore, we awaken to find this harbor town bathed in an entirely new light. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Along the Walami Trail—A Pristine Natural Ecosystem

The Taiwan Railway Administration’s Pu­yuma Express races along the East Rift Valley. We get off at Yuli in Hua­lien County, where we transfer to a bus that goes to the end of the asphalt road that is Taiwan Provincial Highway No. 30, where it meets the unpaved Wa­lami Trail. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

The Hengchun Peninsula—A Green Treasure Store of Culture and Creativity

Coming to the Heng­chun Peninsula at the southern tip of Taiwan, you find yourself at the tail end of the Central Mountain Range, where long, narrow plains are intermixed with hills and plateaus, and a skirt of coral divides the land from the surrounding waters of the Pacific Ocean, the Ba­shi Channel, and the Taiwan Strait. The powerful north­east monsoon that blows from September to March often creates hot, dry “föhn” winds on the lee side of the mountains. Here the diverse flora and fauna and (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Reaching Out to Southeast Asia

Few events in the global economy of 2015 can rival the imminent establishment of the ASEAN Economic Community. This will combine the ASEAN nations, with a total population of over 600 million and a wealth of resources, into the world’s second-largest single market, behind only the European Union. It is spurring a flurry of efforts by other nations to build good relations with the grouping. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

From Taiwan with Love: The ROC’s Humanitarian Work in Thailand

Spread open a map and examine Thailand’s borders. In the north, mainland China isn’t far away. Thailand borders Laos in the east, and Myan­mar in the west. Complex historical, political and economic factors have led to large numbers of refugees in its border regions. (Read More)

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