》Stories

New Southbound Policy。

Winning Hearts: Immigrant Ambassadors Attract New Museum Visitors

“Put your phone on self-timer mode and lay it down on the sixth marble slab counting away from the bottom of the stairs. That way you can capture the dome’s stained glass in the photo, and if you gather everyone in a circle and bring them close, you can get a group shot with the dome.” Dressed in an ao dai, a traditional garment for Vietnamese women, Tran Tu Binh demonstrates the method as she explains it in Vietnamese to some curious compatriots from Vietnam, who follow her directions to get a (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Leave No One Behind

World Health Security Needs Taiwan, Taiwan Needs the WHO. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Love, Compassion, Joy, and Charity— Phra Phrom in Taiwan

Legend has it that every Thursday Phra ­Phrom, the four-faced god, patrols the earthly plane. In an alley off of Tai­pei City’s Chang­chun Road, every day a constant stream of people come to pay their respects to Phra ­Phrom, from uniformed students to besuited office workers. Each person comes bearing flowers and incense, the white smoke curling into the air as though lifting worshippers’ prayers to the heavens and to the four-faced god himself. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Video Awards Build Bridges to Southeast Asia

There are currently about 800,000 people from Southeast Asia living in Taiwan. To encourage them to record their thoughts and feelings about their lives here, the Global Workers’ Organization, Taiwan recently held the 2016 Taiwan Migrants Video Award, giving migrant workers an opportunity to use the camera lens to tell their stories and show what Taiwan looks like through their eyes, and giving the people of Taiwan a chance to know them better. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Two Desserts: Sweet Footnotes to Hard Times

Like countless Southeast-Asian immigrants who have put down roots in Taiwan, Sun Li’an and Li Ai­zhen, who came from Thailand and Indonesia as the brides of Taiwanese men, have had all kinds of trials in life. They have transitioned from suffering discrimination as “foreign brides” to regaining their status and identity, becoming “new residents” of Taiwan. Over time a strange land has become their own, and the flavors of their native regions, once viewed with suspicion, have become dishes on the (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

The Taste of Home: —Savor a Spoonful of Southeast Asian Spices

Over the past decade or so, names of exotic spices such as Thai holy basil, turmeric, tamarind and lemongrass have begun to pop up in Taiwan’s culinary lingo. These aromatic plants are the oft-yearned-for homeland flavors of Southeast Asian people who have come to live and settle in Taiwan. They not only enrich our food culture, they also represent an intriguing medium through which to acquaint ourselves with mainland and maritime Southeast Asia. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Taiwan Youth Overseas Service: Creating Wonderful Memories of Foreign Assignments

Since 2001, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ Taiwan Youth Overseas Service program has assigned more than 1,000 young men to technical missions serving our diplomatic partners. These young people have brought new blood to teams providing  technical assistance in areas ranging from agricultural technology and horticulture to nutrition and medicine, while also gaining an international perspective from their time abroad. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

93Army Coffee Granddaughter of a Forgotten Army

The Alien Realm, a war novel by Taiwan-based author Bo Yang, its 1990 film adaptation A Home Too Far, and the documentary Stranger in the Mountains by Taiwanese director Lee Li-shao, all tell the story of Nationalist soldiers stranded in northern Thailand at the end of the Chinese Civil War, a generation that is nearly extinct and slowly fading from memory. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Wu Ching-kuo, Ambassador of Sport: Taiwan’s International Sports Competitions, Present and Future

The art of entertaining requires a host to plan for all contingencies. Holding an international sports competition is much like entertaining at home or in a restaurant. One must decide if the space is large enough and if the cooks will be able to whip up enough food for the guests, and if the food is sufficiently presentable. Beyond the basics, there are always the guests’ unexpected needs. But meeting all those expectations will ensure a host’s success. (Read More)

New Southbound Policy。

Expert Guides for the Summer Universiade

What are the various ways to watch a sporting competition? Sports events are in many ways performances. From this perspective, the outcome is not particularly important. Everyone has their own particular way of enjoying the spectacle: watching athletes display their vigor, beauty and competitive spirit; exploring the delights of the host city around the various venues; or joining in street events. In this issue, we invited authorities in sport, event management, travel, music, design, and (Read More)

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