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CIP launches 3 translations of books on Austronesian history, culture

The CIP launches three Chinese-language translations of books exploring Austronesian history and culture Jan. 17 in Taipei City. (Courtesy of CIP)

The CIP launches three Chinese-language translations of books exploring Austronesian history and culture Jan. 17 in Taipei City. (Courtesy of CIP)
 

The Cabinet-level Council of Indigenous Peoples published three Chinese-language translations of books spotlighting Austronesian history and culture Jan. 17 in Taipei City, underscoring government efforts to deepen Taiwan’s ties with its Indo-Pacific partners.

First is “Bravo for the Marshallese: Regaining Control in a Post-Nuclear, Post-Colonial World” by Holly Barker, a detailed case study investigating the impact of radiation on the environment and other problems stemming from the U.S. nuclear weapons testing program conducted in the Marshall Islands from 1946-1958.

In addition, “Everyday life in Southeast Asia” by Kathleen Adams and Kathleen Gillogly surveys the geographic, historical, linguistic and religious diversity of Southeast Asia, while “Pacific Histories: Ocean, Land, People” by David Armitage and Alison Bashford is a comprehensive account placing the Pacific Ocean and its islands into a comparative framework of world history.

At an event marking the launch of the translations, CIP Minister Icyang Parod said the books shed light on various aspects of Austronesian history, which is a legacy Taiwan shares alongside many its allies and like-minded partners, including countries targeted under the government’s New Southbound Policy.

The newly released translations are part of a CIP project launched in 2016 seeking to introduce local audiences and other Chinese-speaking communities around the world to Austronesian culture, social developments and related policymaking.

Citing research by scholars from Australia and the U.S., Icyang said Austronesian peoples are likely to have originated in Taiwan more than 5,000 years ago before migrating to other Pacific islands.

A key plank in the government’s national development strategy, the NSP aims to enhance Taiwan’s agricultural, business, cultural, education, tourism and trade ties with the 10 Association of Southeast Asian Nations member states, six South Asian countries, Australia and New Zealand. (SFC-E)