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Tsai lauds Taiwan’s achievements in human rights, transitional justice

President Tsai Ing-wen delivers a speech Dec. 5 during an event held in New Taipei City to mark the upcoming Human Rights Day. (Courtesy of the Presidential Office)

President Tsai Ing-wen delivers a speech Dec. 5 during an event held in New Taipei City to mark the upcoming Human Rights Day. (Courtesy of the Presidential Office)
 

President Tsai Ing-wen said Dec. 5 that Taiwan has made significant progress in bolstering human rights while promoting transitional justice, underscoring the government’s commitment to safeguarding freedom and democracy while redressing judicial wrongs.

Advancements in the two areas have been made by launching a series of targeted laws and organizations, Tsai said. Case in point is the establishment in 2018 of the Transitional Justice Commission, which is tasked with declassifying political archives, conducting investigations and delivering restitution to victims, she added.

This was complemented by implementation of the Political Archives Act last year, Tsai said, adding that inaugurations of the National Human Rights Museum in 2018 and National Human Rights Commission earlier this year have also played pivotal roles in restoring historical truths and strengthening cooperation on related issues with countries and territories worldwide.

Tsai made the remarks during an event held in New Taipei City to mark the upcoming Human Rights Day. Observed on Dec. 10, the day was launched by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948.

According to Tsai, the government will continue advancing human rights and transitional justice to ensure the country’s long-lasting liberty. By facing the agony of the past, the country as a whole will move forward and build a common future, she said.

NHRM is the country’s primary facility for collecting and preserving historical documents and materials relating to human rights dating from the end of 50 years of Japanese colonial rule Aug. 15, 1945, to the lifting of martial law five years after Taiwan proper in outlying Kinmen and Matsu islands Nov. 7, 1992. Meanwhile, NHRC—overseen by the Control Yuan as per the Paris Principles adopted in 1993 by the U.N. General Assembly—is set to review complaints of abuse and discrimination, as well as draft the National Human Rights Report and advise government agencies on related policymaking. (YCH-E)